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Outdoor Portrait Photography: 12 Tips for Beautiful Results

The post Outdoor Portrait Photography: 12 Tips for Beautiful Results appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Guest Contributor.

12 tips for outdoor portraits

If you’re looking to capture stunning outdoor portrait photography, you’ve come to the right place.

In this article, I’m going to share my absolute favorite tips for outdoor portraits, including:

How to choose the perfect focal lengthHow to focus for tack-sharp resultsThe best light for outdoor portrait shootingKey settings and file typesMuch more!

So let’s improve your images, starting with my number one tip:

1. Never select all of the focus points for portraits

If you want to take beautiful portraits, consistently, then you’ve got to nail focusing.

And a huge, huge focusing mistake I see beginners make? Using either the Auto AF area mode, where the camera picks the focus point for you, or using a large number of focus points in the hopes that one will cover the subject.

Unfortunately, neither of those options works, and you’ll often end up with out-of-focus, blurry shots.

Instead, I recommend two options:

For photographers using older cameras, pick a single focus point (the one in the center of the viewfinder works well). Then use that single point to lock focus (and recompose as necessary).For photographers with newer cameras, consider using your model’s Eye AF technology. This will hone in on your subject’s eye and (ideally) nail focus. Not all Eye AF is created equal, so before you devote yourself to it, make sure your camera does a good job. But if you do a test and come away with lots of sharp photos, it’s a great setting to use.

2. Always focus on the eyes

The eyes are the windows to the soul and should be the focal point of any good portrait. Plus, the eyes are the most detailed element on the face and should be portrayed that way.

(When you are shooting with a wide aperture and you’re focused on the eyes, the shallow depth of field effect will soften the skin, too.)

As discussed in the previous section, you should be focusing with either a single AF point or your camera’s Eye AF function. If you’re working with a single AF point, place it over the eye and lock focus, then recompose if required. If you’re working with your camera’s Eye AF, then make sure it’s finding your subject’s eye, then shoot with abandon!

tips for outdoor portrait photography man coming out of the water

3. Shoot with a wide aperture for a shallow depth of field

A wide aperture will produce a shallow depth of field effect, which blurs the background and makes your subject stand out.

So if you can shoot at f/2.8 or even f/1.8, you should. Of course, not all lenses can use such a wide aperture; some fail to go past f/5.6 and beyond. I’d recommend investing in a wide-aperture lens if possible (and there are plenty of wonderful budget options, such as a 50mm f/1.8).

4. Don’t shoot a portrait at less than 50mm; try to stay at 70mm or higher

The last thing you want to hear from a client is, “Why does my head look swollen?”

Which might happen if you insist on shooting at 35mm, 24mm, or wider.

Sure, it provides an interesting effect, but the distortion you get at focal lengths wider than 50mm generally isn’t flattering and should be avoided in nearly all circumstances.

(The exception is in the case of environmental portraits, where you can keep your subject small in the frame and use the wider focal length to provide context.)

Personally, I like shooting at 70mm and beyond. The longer the lens, the greater the compression effect, which in turn creates better background blur (i.e., bokeh). Most of my portraits are done between 120mm and 200mm.

If you’re just getting started with portrait photography, consider purchasing an 85mm lens. There are decently priced 85mm f/1.8 lenses on the market, which are relatively compact and will provide a nice background blur.

5. Always shoot in RAW, not JPEG

These words have bellowed from my mouth a thousand times, and they will surely come out a million more. The RAW file format is an unmodified compilation of your sensor’s data during the time of exposure. It is your digital negative. And it gives you immense post-processing flexibility, not to mention improved image quality.

When you shoot in JPEG format, much of what you capture is stripped away. You lose lots of key information, including color nuance and tonal range. It’s a recipe for disaster.

So stick to RAW files. Yes, they’re larger and require processing. But unless you’re a photojournalist on an ultra-tight deadline, they’re worth the extra effort.

(If you love the shareability of a JPEG and can’t see yourself shooting without it, then consider using your camera’s RAW+JPEG mode, which saves both a RAW file and a JPEG file at the time of capture.)

6. Always bring a gray card or a piece of a gray card for white balance

To avoid confusion, I am going to explain this backward. When opening Adobe Camera Raw or any other RAW image editing application, there is always a way to select a custom white balance. Usually, it is an eyedropper of some kind that you can use to click on what you think is neutral gray in your image.

Now, imagine a world where your photoshoot involved 4 locations and a total of 800 images, and all day your camera was set to Auto White Balance. You might end up with 800 different white balance values, a post-production nightmare.

But if at each location you have your subject hold the gray card on the first shot, you will save hours of work. When you open images in your favorite post-production application, all you have to do is click the eyedropper on the gray card, select all the photos from that location, and synchronize the edit. Precious hours will be saved.

(It may be wise to take a gray card shot once every 30 minutes or so to compensate for the changing light of day.)

7. Avoid direct sunlight in your outdoor portraits

Direct sunlight is harsh, makes your subject squint, and creates hard directional shadows and unpredictable white balance conditions.

Which is why you should avoid direct sun as much as possible.

Instead, shoot in one of three conditions:

ShadeOvercast skiesA low sun (i.e., around sunrise or sunset)

That way, you can lose the harsh shadows and photograph your subject in soft, flattering light. With proper exposure and white balance, you can make such shots look amazing.

8. If you must use direct sunlight, work carefully

In the previous section, I explained why you should never shoot in direct sunlight.

But sometimes you get stuck. A client insists on a particular photoshoot time and place, or the sun comes out from behind the beautiful clouds, and you’re forced to work with what you have.

woman standing in a field

And in such situations, you can take certain steps to get the best possible results.

First, pay careful attention to the direction of the light. Putting the sun directly behind your subject isn’t a good idea, unless you are trying to make a silhouette. Instead, try putting the sun at your back, then have the subject look off-camera (away from the sun) to prevent squinting. Another great trick is to wait for a cloud to move in front of the sun; this usually creates a very bright-yet-contrasty look.

Also, if possible, use some sort of reflector to minimize shadows on your subject. Invest in a portable, pop-up reflector, or – if necessary, use an existing reflector, which I discuss in more detail in the next section.

9. Work with a natural reflector

While outdoor photography might seem reflector-free, there are actually plenty of natural and human-made reflectors you can use to improve your photos.

Here are just a few outdoor reflector ideas:

White delivery trucksWhite building wallsWhite carsWhite sandWhite signsWhite tables

You get the idea? And if you’re heading into a location where a natural reflector might not exist, then make sure to bring one. As I mentioned above, you can buy a pop-up reflector, though you might also make one out of foam core or white cardboard.

10. Learn the Sunny 16 rule

The Sunny 16 rule is a classic guideline from the film days, one that lets you determine the proper exposure on sunny days – without an exposure meter.

Of course, pretty much every camera comes with an exposure meter these days, but it’s not always accurate, and it can be good to have a technique to fall back on in uncertain situations.

So here’s the Sunny 16 rule:

On a sunny day, with your aperture value set to ƒ/16, your shutter speed will be the inverse of your current ISO speed. If your camera is set to ISO 100 and your aperture value is ƒ/16, your shutter speed will be 1/100s. And if your camera is set to ISO 200 and your aperture value is f/16, your shutter speed will be 1/200s.

On a cloudy day (or when you’re shooting in the shade), you can simply use ƒ/8 instead.

woman staring at the camera outdoor portrait photography

11. Bring a sheet and a few spring clamps from home

You know that cheap old sheet you stuck in the corner of the closet to use as a drop cloth the next time you paint? Add it to your kit and take it with you every time you head out for an outdoor portrait shoot.

(Another option is to buy the cheapest low-thread-count white top sheet you can find.)

What should you do with it? Well, a sheet is an amazing, cheap diffuser – sort of a seven-foot softbox for the sun.

So take note of the sun’s position, then use the sheet to block the light. If you need a sidelight diffuser, clamp an edge of the sheet around a branch. Anchor the bottom corners with rocks to keep the sheet from blowing into your image.

For an overhead diffuser, clamp all four corners to branches above your subject.

12. Avoid powerlines and signs

We have already discussed keeping your camera focused on the eyes – but you must also keep the viewer’s mind focused on the image as a whole, specifically on your portrait subject.

Powerlines, signs, long single blades of grass, single pieces of garbage, and sometimes even trees can be serious distractions in an otherwise great outdoor portrait photo.

So before you take a single shot, look carefully at the area surrounding your subject. Do you see any distractions? Anything that might take away from the photo? If so, either clean it up, or move your subject into a position where such background distractions aren’t visible.

Look at the photo below. Do you see how clean the background is? That’s the goal.

woman in nature at sunset

Outdoor portrait photography: final words

Well, there you have it:

12 tips to take your outdoor portraits to the next level. Whether you’re capturing outdoor headshots, full-body shots, or even group shots, these tips should serve you well, so commit them to memory and use them the next time you’re out shooting.

Most importantly, have a great time! Enjoy what you’re doing, and it will show in your work!

This is a guest post by James Pickett.

Table of contents

Portrait Photography

GENERAL 15 Common Portrait Mistakes to Avoid 10 Ways to Direct a Portrait Shoot like a Pro How to Photograph People: 7 Tips for Photographers Who Never Photograph People 10 Crucial Things You Need to Think About for Portrait Photography 5 Portrait Photography Rules You Should Probably Ignore Five Budget Portrait Photography Hacks to Save You Money 8 Lessons Learned from My First Attempt at Portrait Photography How Self-Portraiture Makes You a Better Photographer The Photo Critique: Portrait Edition 10 Shots, 10 Portraits, 1 Focal Length: Take this Photography Challenge How I Got The Shot: Portrait Style PREPARATION Tips for Preparing for a Portrait Session 8 Tips to Help Make People Comfortable for Their Portrait Session Clothing for Portraits – How to Tell your Subjects What to Wear How to Plan a Successful Sunset Portrait Session 5 Secrets for Finding Great Indoor Photoshoot Locations 10 Christmas Portrait Locations (with Bonus Lighting and Composition Tips) How to Build a Bench Prop for Great Portrait Photos A Beginners Guide to Taking Portraits of Elderly Clients: Part 1 – Preparation and Rapport How to Scout for Portrait Shooting Locations The Importance of Location for Outdoor Portraits How to Choose Urban Landscapes for Portrait Photography SETTINGS The Best Camera Settings for Portrait Photography How to Achieve Blurred Backgrounds in Portrait Photography How to Bypass the Portrait Mode on Your Digital Camera and Get Great Portraits Understanding the Focus and Recompose Technique Overcoming Depth of Field Problems in Portraits 9 Ways to Ensure You Get Sharp Images When Photographing People Stunning Portraits: Manipulating White Balance Shooting for HDR Portraiture How [Not] to Take a Self Timer Portrait How Focal Length Changes the Shape of the Face in Portraiture LIGHTING 5 Tips How to Set Up a Home Studio for Dramatic Portraits Simple Portrait Setups You Can Create on a Tight Budget How to Eliminate Reflections in Glasses in Portraits Portrait Photography: How to Photograph People in the Harsh Midday Sun 4 Ways to Shoot Portraits in the Middle of the Day 6 Portrait Lighting Patterns Every Photographer Should Know 3 Lighting Setups for Photographing Headshots 6 Ways of Using Reflector to Take Better Portraits How to Create and Shoot Night Portraits How to Make Beautiful Portraits Using Flash and High-Speed Sync How to Make a Low Key Portrait (Step by Step) Fill Flash Photography: How to Get Beautiful Portraits (Even in Bad Light) A Lighting Ratios Guide: How to Make (or Break) Your Portraits How to Mix Ambient Light and Fill-Flash for Outdoor Portraits How to Photograph Fantastic Portraits with One Flash DIY How to Build and Use a Reflector to Take Better Portraits Understanding Light for Better Portrait Photography Tips for Doing Natural Light Headshots and Portraits 3 Reasons to do Headshots with Natural Light A Beginners Guide to Taking Portraits of Elderly Clients: Part 2 – Lighting and Posing How to Create Stunning Wide-Angle Portraits (Using an Off-Camera Flash) Tips for Making the Most of Morning Light for Portraits 5 Ways to Use a Beauty Dish Light for Portraits Beginners Tips for Sunrise Portraits : Part I Getting to Grips with Fill Light in Portrait Photography How to Use Flash for Night Portraits What Size Beauty Dish is Right For Your Portrait Photography? How to Create Catch Lights in Your Natural Light Portraits Tips for Using Golden Hour Light for Portraits Side-by-side comparison between reflectors and diffusers for portraits 6 Tips for Taking Better Natural Light Classic Portraits How to Use a Small Softbox With Your Flash to Transform Your Portraits Simple Tips for Positioning Your Portrait Subject to Leverage Natural Light The Importance of Shadows in Portrait Photography So You Have No Model? Here are Ways to Practice Your Portrait Lighting With Toys How to use Colored Gels to Create Unique and Creative Portraits 3 Steps to Professional Looking Headshots Using One Flash How to Use Two LED Lights to Achieve Moody Portraits Made in the Shade – Why Taking Portraits in the Shade Can be Ideal What Is Good Light? (And How to Use It for Beautiful Portraits) How to do Accent Lighting for Portraits Tips For Great Indoor Portraits Using Natural Light 5 Reasons for Doing Natural Light Portraits Review of the Westcott Eyelighter for Headshots and Portraits How to Use Angle of Light in People Photography for Added Punch High Speed Sync Versus a Neutral Density Filter to Overcome Bright Sunlight in Portraits 5 Creative Portrait Lighting Tricks Using Only Phone Light How to Use Off-camera Flash to Fix Lighting Problems for Outdoor Portraits How to Create Awesome Portrait Lighting with a Paper Bag an Elastic Band and a Chocolate Donut Tips for Using Speedlights to Create the Right Lighting for Outdoor Portraits How to use a Gobo to add Depth to Your Portraits with Subtractive Lighting How to Use Hard Lighting to Create a Dramatic Portrait Portrait Comparison – Flash Versus Natural Light Stealing Light – Using Street Lights for Portraits Five Places for Perfect Natural Portrait Lighting How to See the Light for Portraits: A Quick Tip for Beginners Shooting with Available Light – Lifestyle Portraiture 5 Ways to Light Your Christmas Tree Portraits This Festive Season A Simple Lighting Technique for Couples Portraits Awash In Light: High Key Portraiture A Portrait Lighting Project for a Rainy Day Simple Portrait Lighting Setup: Gorgeous Result How to Achieve Great Portraits with Window Light A Simple Exercise on Working with Natural Light in Portraits Small Flash Portraits on Location with Adorama TV Portraits on an Overcast Day? Use a Reflector Tips for Using Flash for Beach Portraits How to Find and Use Natural Reflectors for Portraits How to Create Dramatic Portraits with Shadow Photography Tips for Portrait Photography in Overcast Weather How to Photograph People Outdoors Without Using a Reflector How To Use an Outdoor Studio for Natural Portraits POSING Female Poses: 21 Posing Ideas to Get You Started Photographing Women Glamour Posing Guide: 21 Sample Poses to Get You Started Posing Guide: 21 Sample Poses to Get You Started with Photographing Men Good Crop Bad Crop – How to Crop Portraits How to Pose and Angle the Body for Better Portraits Posing Guide: 21 Sample Poses to Get You Started with Photographing Groups of People Posing Guide: 21 Sample Poses to Get You Started with Photographing Couples Your Guide to the Best Poses for Engagement Photos How to do Gentle Posing: A Collection of Prompts to Get You Started Tips for Posing Large Families and Groups How to Pose People for Headshots Tips for Posing People in Outdoor Portraits 20 Tips for Getting People to Smile in Photos How to Avoid Fake Smiles in Your People Photography Tips for Posing Muscular Female Body Types Your Posing Guide for Maternity Sessions Handiwork: How to Pose Hands Your Guide to Posing Bands in Photography Posing Tip for Portraits – Which Way Should Your Subject Lean? Posing Tips – Waistlines, Thighs and Bustlines 3 Posing Tips for Young Siblings What Everybody Ought to Know About Posing for Portraits Poser: Achieve Perfect Portrait Expression Capturing Better Portraits Between Poses A Posing Technique from A Girl With a Pearl Earring Tips for Posing Men COMPOSITION 6 Types of Portrait Backgrounds for Creative Images 6 Tips for Perfect Composition in Portrait Photography How to Find Great Backgrounds for Outdoor Portraits How to Make Colors Pop in Your Portraits – Without Using Photoshop How to Use Foreground Framing to Improve Your Portrait Photography How to Use Negative Space in People Photography 3 Simple Ways to Use Framing and Layering in Portraits Is Portrait Formatting always best for Portraits? Portrait Tip: Don't Fill the Frame How to Use Portrait Angles More Creatively: A Visual Guide How to Use Facial View and Camera Angle to take Flattering Portraits GEAR Comparing a 50mm Versus 85mm Lens for Photographing People Comparing a 24mm Versus 50mm Lens for Photographing People 3 Tips for Taking Portraits with a Kit Lens Best Fujifilm X-Series Kit for Urban Portraits 3 Ways to Get Killer Portraits Using a Tripod Photographing Portraits with Classic Lenses (includes Example Images) Portrait Photographers: Do You Really Need a 70-200mm Lens? Essential Portrait Photography Gear You Need When Starting Out Portable Portrait Studio in a Bag: Now You Can Take Portraits While on the Road How to Choose the Perfect Portrait Lens Which 50mm Lens is Best for Portraits? ADVANCED GUIDES 13 Tips for Improving Outdoor Portraits 1. Never select all of the focus points for portraits2. Always focus on the eyes3. Shoot with a wide aperture for a shallow depth of field4. Don’t shoot a portrait at less than 50mm; try to stay at 70mm or higher5. Always shoot in RAW, not JPEG6. Always bring a gray card or a piece of a gray card for white balance7. Avoid direct sunlight in your outdoor portraits8. If you must use direct sunlight, work carefully9. Work with a natural reflector10. Learn the Sunny 16 rule11. Bring a sheet and a few spring clamps from home12. Avoid powerlines and signsOutdoor portrait photography: final words1. Never select all of the focus points for portraits2. Always focus on the eyes3. Shoot with a wide aperture for a shallow depth of field4. Don’t shoot a portrait at less than 50mm; try to stay at 70mm or higher5. Always shoot in RAW, not JPEG6. Always bring a gray card or a piece of a gray card for white balance7. Avoid direct sunlight in your outdoor portraits8. If you must use direct sunlight, work carefully9. Work with a natural reflector10. Learn the Sunny 16 rule11. Bring a sheet and a few spring clamps from home12. Avoid powerlines and signsOutdoor portrait photography: final wordsCreate Beautiful Indoor Portraits Without Flash (NSFW) 10 Tips for Photographing Great Headshots 3 Simple Ways to Create Stunning Eyes in Your Portrait Photography 11 Tips for Photographing High School Senior Portraits Tips for Doing Fall Portraits 6 Tips for Photographing Large People 7 Tips for Black and White Portrait Photography How to Create Environmental Portraits (Tips and Examples) Capturing Unenthusiastic Teens: Forget the Perfect Pose and Get Photos You Truly Love Tips for Taking the Torture out of Extended Family Portrait Sessions Self Portrait Photography Tips What the Mona Lisa Can Teach You About Taking Great Portraits 5 Tips for Musician Portraits (So You Can Hit All the Right Notes) 5 Tips to Help You Take More Natural Looking Portraits 15 Tips for More Powerful Portraits How to Create Dramatic Portraits in Your Garage 9 Tips that Make Couples Happy During a Portrait Session 5 Tips for Taking Better Portraits in Nature Snow Portrait: Behind the Scenes Tips for Creating Dance Portraits How to Take Better Beach Portraits at Any Time of Day The Introverts Guide to Photographing People 6 Ways to Take a Candid Portrait of Somebody You Know 3 Body Language Hacks to Improve Your Portrait Photography 5 More Tips for Making Better Black and White Portraits Tips for Planning and Capturing a Creative Portrait 5 Tips for Creating Romantic Portraits of Couples 10 Tips to Create Emotive Portraits 7 Tips for Photographing a Bridal Portrait Session 3 Lessons I Learned by Doing a Self-Portrait Project The Ultimate Guide to Photographing People for the Shy Photographer Tips for Getting Yourself to Relax as a Photographer and Have More Successful Portrait Sessions Tips for Taking More Natural Engagement Portraits 6 Tips for Better Portraits on Location 7 Ways to Take Advantage of Autumn in Your Portrait Photography 7 Tips and Etiquette for Taking Portraits in Public How to Make a Unique Portrait in the City at Night 3 Tips for Creating Outstanding Portraits, Inspired by the work of Dutch Artist Van Gogh 5 Keys to Taking Beautiful Maternity Portraits Photographing People: To do Styled Portraits or Not? 7 Steps to Capturing Truth in Your Portraiture Engagement Portrait Shoots: 7 Professional Tips to take your Engagement Shoots to the Next Level Personalities and Portraits – and Getting Them to Mix 3 Reasons to Have Your Own Portrait Taken 5 Tips for Photographing Portfolio-Worthy Costume Portraits 3 Critical People Skills Portrait Photographers Need The Essence of Masculinity – Portraits of Men 5 Corporate-Style Portrait Techniques 5 Tips for Doing Portrait Photography in Busy Locations Tips for Great Beach Sunset Portraits CREATIVE TECHNIQUES How to Create Portraits with a Black Background How Using Props in Portraits Can Make Your Photos More Interesting How to Take Unique Crystal Ball Portraits How to Create a Hollywood Film Noir Portrait How to Create this “Fight Club” Inspired Portrait using One Light Dragging the Shutter for Creative Portraits 5 Secrets for Creating Perfect Silhouette Portrait Photography How to do Tilt-Shift Portraits Copper, Prisms, and Orbs, Oh My! – 3 Creative Techniques for People Photography Portrait Tip: Add Interest and Movement into Your Shots with Wind Glitter Portrait: How I Took It How to Create a Unique Bokeh Portrait for Under $10 5 Ways to Use a Piece of Glass for Unique Portraits Room with a View: How to Create this Window with Blinds Portrait Anywhere 7 Steps to Perfect White Portrait Backgrounds in the Studio How to Make Unique Portraits Using Light Painting POST-PROCESSING 11 Steps for Basic Portrait Editing in Lightroom – A Beginner’s Guide Five Common Portrait Retouching Mistakes to Avoid How to Create a Dramatic Cinematic Style Portrait Using Photoshop Color Grading How to Edit Corporate Headshots in Lightroom How to Create a Dark and Moody Rembrandt-Style Portrait In Lightroom How to Retouch a Portrait with the Adjustment Brush in Lightroom Photoshop: Red Eye Fix for Difficult Cases in People and Pets 3 Steps to Photoshop Retouching for Natural Looking Portraits How to do Frequency Separation Portrait Retouching in Photoshop Basic Portrait Post-Processing Workflow Tips to Help You Save Time and Stay Organized How to Add a Grunge Effect to Your Portraits Using Lightroom How to Create Twinkle Lights for Christmas Tree Portraits in Photoshop How to Enhance Portraits Using Gray Layers to Dodge and Burn in Photoshop How to Blur the Background of a Portrait Using the Magnetic Lasso Tool in Photoshop How to Use Photoshop Blending Modes for Fine Art Portraiture Stylized Techniques for Editing Portraits Using Lightroom How to Make a Bubble Portrait using Photoshop CS3 Creating a Black and White High Contrast Portrait Edit in Lightroom How to Create a “Soft Portrait” Preset in Lightroom 4 Basic Photoshop Tutorial – How to Add Creative Overlays to Your Portraits 3 Essential Photoshop Tools for New Portrait Photographers How to Make Creative Lightroom Develop Presets for Portraits 5 Reasons to Use Lightroom for Portrait Retouching Advanced Portrait Retouch on a Male Subject in Lightroom 4 – Part 1 of 3 3 Ways to Make Selective Color Portraits Using Lightroom and Silver Efex Pro 2 Correcting For Under Exposure and Boosting Dynamic Range with an Environmental Portrait in Lightroom 4 How to do Portrait Retouching With Luminar Tips for Portrait Processing with ON1 Photo RAW 2018.5 5 Tips to Cut Your Portrait Editing Time in Half BUSINESS Portrait Consultations: Two Questions That Make A Big Difference How to Shoot a Self Portrait to Support your Brand Identity INSPIRATION 5 Examples of Beautiful Simple Portraits DISCUSS: When you Photograph People in Black and White, you Photograph their Souls 21 Inspirational Natural Light Portraits 24 Photos of Perfectly Posed Portraits 19 More Creative Mirror Self Portraits 18 Stunning Self Portraits Interview with Fine Art Portrait Photographer Bill Gekas 11 Influential Portrait Photographers you Need to Know Black and White Portraits a Set of Images to Admire Nadav Kander on Portrait Photography [VIDEO] 21 Spooky Portraits Inspiring Portraits of Women – a Collection of Images 12.5 Years of Daily Self Portraits [VIDEO] Interview with Self Portrait and 365 Photographer – Anna Gay Triptych Portrait Series 8 Striking Portraits from Photograph Einar Erici [Shot in 1930] An Interview With Underwater Portrait Photographer Sacha Blue Masters of Photography – Yousuf Karsh Portrait Photographer 21 Fun Images of People Laughing RESOURCES Portrait Photography: Secrets of Posing & Lighting [Book Review] The Luminous Portrait: Book Review The Portrait Photography Course by Mark Jenkinson – Book Review The Perfect Portrait Guide – How to Photograph People – Book Review Improve Your Portraits with these Courses from Ed Verosky People Photography and Portraits: Best Resources Toolbox

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Avoid direct sunlight in your outdoor portraits”},{“id”:”if-you-must-use-direct-sunlight-work-carefully”,”permalink”:”https:\/\/digital-photography-school.com\/13-tips-for-improving-outdoor-portraits\/”,”title”:”8. If you must use direct sunlight, work carefully”},{“id”:”work-with-a-natural-reflector”,”permalink”:”https:\/\/digital-photography-school.com\/13-tips-for-improving-outdoor-portraits\/”,”title”:”9. Work with a natural reflector”},{“id”:”learn-the-sunny-rule”,”permalink”:”https:\/\/digital-photography-school.com\/13-tips-for-improving-outdoor-portraits\/”,”title”:”10. Learn the Sunny 16 rule”},{“id”:”bring-a-sheet-and-a-few-spring-clamps-from-home”,”permalink”:”https:\/\/digital-photography-school.com\/13-tips-for-improving-outdoor-portraits\/”,”title”:”11. Bring a sheet and a few spring clamps from home”},{“id”:”avoid-powerlines-and-signs”,”permalink”:”https:\/\/digital-photography-school.com\/13-tips-for-improving-outdoor-portraits\/”,”title”:”12. Avoid powerlines and signs”},{“id”:”outdoor-portrait-photography-final-words”,”permalink”:”https:\/\/digital-photography-school.com\/13-tips-for-improving-outdoor-portraits\/”,”title”:”Outdoor portrait photography: final words”}] };

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